Glossary

Glossary

Term Description
Adaptive Management A formal process for improving management practices based on new information from research or monitoring.
Adsorbable Organic Halogens (AOX) A measurement often used in waste water testing to indicate the overall level of the halogens, fluorine, chlorine, bromine and iodine. In pulp and paper manufacturing, organic halogens are commonly byproducts of chlorine bleaching processes.
Annual Allowable Cut The amount of timber that a company is permitted to sustainably harvest each year without exceeding the forests growth rate.
Biodiversity The variety and variability among living organisms and the ecological complexes in which they occur.
Biochemical Oxygen Demand The measurement of the amount of molecular oxygen in the water that is consumed by microorganisms during the process of decomposition.
Black Liquor The spent liquor recovered from the pulping process. It contains organic and inorganic compounds.
Canopy The top layer of the forest.
Carbon credit An acknowledgement of an amount of carbon stored or sequestered in a carbon sink, which can be used by governments, or other organizations, to offset greenhouse gas emissions.
Carbon sink A pool or reservoir that stores carbon, hence lowering the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. All plants act as a carbon sink, since they absorb carbon from the atmosphere.
Central Tire Inflation An air inflation system installed on vehicles which can automatically adjust tire air pressure. This helps reduce rutting on roads, improves road compaction and can result in better fuel efficiency during highway transportation.
Coniferous tree Cone-bearing trees with needles or scale-like leaves. Often referred to as softwood.
Deciduous tree Tree and shrub species that lose their leaves annually. The wood of these trees are referred to as hardwood.
Ecological Benchmark Areas set aside from industrial activity, to act as a reference to compare to working landscapes.
Ecosystem management A method of forest stewardship that considers the ecological, social and economic values of forest use and attempts to balance them
Fire ecology The study of fire and its effects on the natural environment.
Fly ash Ash produced in the boiler as a result of burning hog fuel.
Forest Management Agreement (FMA) A renewable agreement between the Alberta government and a company that grants that company the rights and obligations to manage, grow and harvest timber in a specified area on a sustained yield basis.
Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) An international organization which developed a strict set of standards, by which forest operations can voluntarily work with a third-party auditor to evaluate their forest management practices toward certification. FSC's standards assess areas such as environmental performance, community relations, Aboriginal relations, employee relations and forest management planning.
Greenhouse gas Gases that provide an insulating effect in the earth's atmosphere, potentially leading to global climate change. These gases include carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and water vapour as well as man made gases (fluorocarbons). Green Liquor
Hog Fuel Waste wood such as saw dust and bark that is burned to help generate "green electricity".
Hybrid Poplar Poplar trees produced by the crossbreeding of different poplar species.
Integrated Landscape Management (ILM) An initiative between resource companies to reduce their environmental footprint by coordinating activities and collaborating on research and development.
Kraft pulp A chemical pulp produced by combining wood chips and chemicals in huge vats known as digesters. The effect of the heat and the chemicals dissolves the lignin that binds the cellulose fibers together, without breaking the wood fibres, creating a strong pulp product.
Lignin The organic substance, which bonds cellulose fibres together, forming the woody material in a tree.
Mixedwood stands Stands of forest containing both deciduous and coniferous species in the overstorey.
Mixedwood Management The managing of a forest to ensure a healthy mix of both deciduous and coniferous species.
Natural disturbance Natural disturbance in the boreal forest is mainly through wildfire, and a lesser degree by windthrow, flooding, drought, insect and disease cycles.
Quick lime Reactive lime (CaO) formed during the calcining process.
Silviculture The practice of planting and tending trees.
Single-line pulp mill Pulp manufacturing facility that produces pulp with one continuous production line.
Snag A dead standing tree that provides important habitat for wildlife.
Stand structure Stand structure is the physical form of the forest. Features of structure include live merchantable trees of all types and ages, standing dead trees (snags), downed logs, and non-merchantable vegetation (e.g. shrubs and grass).
Sustained yield The quantity of a resource that can be produced continuously under a given management regime.
Suckering The process by which deciduous trees regenerate from existing root systems.
Total Suspended Solids (TSS) Matter suspended in water or wastewater.
Understorey Trees or other vegetation in a forest stand below the main canopy level.
Watershed An area of land, which may or may not be under forest cover, draining water, organic matter, dissolved nutrients, and sediments into a lake or stream.
White area The area in Alberta that is generally recognized to be the agricultural zone - primarily private land.
White Liquor The cooking liquor in kraft pulp mills.